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Glow-in-the-Dark Kryptonite Candy Will Defeat Your Super Sweet Tooth

by Lambert Varias

I’ve never heard of a supervillain-themed party, but if you’re planning on throwing one then you might want to check out this recipe for Kryptonite Candy by Britt Michelsen aka BrittLiv, the same person who made the Pixel Trash Can. BrittLiv used Riboflavin vitamin B2 in place of the non-existent mineral, because apparently the nutrient glows in UV light, and even in direct light.

glowing_kryptonite_candy_1

Making kryptonite candy seems pretty simple. All you need are some vitamin B2 pills, water, sugar and food coloring. The only tricky part is that you’ll have to cook with as little light as possible. More on that in a bit.

So why would you need to make this candy in the dark? You see, unlike Superman’s most hated ore, Kryptonite Candy won’t glow forever. According to BrittLiv, exposure to light will eventually “destroy” Vitamin B2, but the process is pretty slow so you’ll have ample time to enjoy your glow-in-the-dark candy. BrittLiv didn’t mention if it’s still safe to eat the candy after the Vitamin B2 has degraded. Now that might be your stomach’s kryptonite. Practice your evil laughter and check out Instructables for the recipe.

[via Make:]




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Comments (2):

  1. BrittLiv says:

    Hi, thanks for posting, it is safe, it is the same process that happens if you store milk in glass bottles. In order to see what would happen, I left them in the sun for a week, the effect has faded a bit, but is still clearly noticeable. So it’s better, if you store them in a nontransparent box (if you are able to stop you from eating them right away ;-)).

  2. BrittLiv says:

    Hi, thanks for posting, it is safe, it is the same process that happens if you store milk in glass bottles. In order to see what would happen, I left them in the sun for a week, the effect has faded a bit, but is still clearly noticeable. So it’s better, if you store them in a nontransparent box (if you are able to stop you from eating them right away ;-)).

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