X

This website uses cookies.

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By using our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our Cookie Policy.

I agree
Learn More
Great Geek Gifts in the Technabob Shop!Get Technabob Daily: Join our Mailing List! | Follow Us: Facebook | Twitter
Awesomer Media Sites: THE AWESOMER | MIGHTYMEGA | 95OCTANE
subscribe to our rss feedsubscribe via e-mailfollow technabob on twittertechnabob facebook fan pageGoogle+follow us in feedly
Follow Us:
Cool Gadgets, Gizmos, Games and Geek Stuff on Technabob

Scribble Pen: Real or Not?

by Hazel Chua
Advertisement

For many, Scribble seemed like the best thing since sliced bread. It was a pen that could copy the color of absolutely anything simply by pushing its built-in scanner against an object. The pen could then be used to write in the scanned color on paper or on a tablet, since a stylus and ink pen version were in the works.

After months of anticipation, Scribble launched on Kickstarter on August 11th, quickly raising over three times its fundraising goal – only to have the project creators pull the plug and cancel it two days later.

scribble_penzoom in

In between requests for tech specs, delayed responses, and features that seemed to change after every few hours, Kickstarter apparently reached out to the Scribble team with a request for a video showing the prototype. Unable to comply with Kickstarter’s 24-hour deadline, the creators cancelled the project with nary an announcement prior to doing so.

This led to already-skeptical backers questioning the existence of the prototype, with some wondering if the creator really had the tech and engineering knowhow to turn the pen into a reality. Just several days ago, the project was relaunched on Tilt, with the comments box tellingly removed from the page.

This brings us up to date. Drop Kicker recently posted discrepancies on the new video that Scribble posted on Tilt, and ex-backers have continued the discuss the shadiness on the project’s original Kickstarter page. It’s pretty clear that the pen shown in the video is not a working prototype, but only a mockup, and post-production and editing trickery was used to make it look like it was drawing.

scribble_pen_videozoom in

How everything unfolded is extremely disappointing, considering I, along with many, backed the project when it went live. But you be the judge: do you think this project is a scam? Or do you still believe they can make it happen? With nearly $200,000 raised on their Tilt project, it seems that many out there still support it.

P.S.: Here’s a worthwhile alternative if you’re just interested in the color sampling capability: the Mozbii.

Hot Deals in the Technabob Shop:



Comments are closed for posts older than 90 days.

Comments (2):

  1. Gunnar says:

    “Unfortunately, the folks at tilt.com have recently closed our campaign without reason. The issue at hand seems to be whether or not we have a working prototype of Scribble, despite clearly stating that this was not a condition of raising funds on their site prior to the start of our campaign.”
    So, it seems like they are admitting that they haven’t got a prototype…

  2. Dave Franklin says:

    This is clearly a hoax, or a naive undertaking by someone with little or no knowledge of color science. RGB is a color gamut defined by light. In the absence of light, you have black. When you add 100% Red Green and Blue light together in the same area, you achieve white light. You cannot apply those same principles to ink and reflective color. To achieve the widest possible color gamut using 4 or less inks, you would have to rely on the CMY or CMYK color space used by the printing industry. (Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow can be mixed together in different percentages to achieve a reasonable approximation of many colors when printed on white paper. A mix of 100% CMY would achieve the color Black. Black ink (K) is also usually added to the process to achieve darker blacks with less ink coverage.) The CMYK colorspace has a respectable gamut, but it most certainly cannot reproduce “Every colour in the world.” What about fluorescent colors? What about metallic colors? In the photo it shows what looks like Red, Orange, and Purple being used in the pen. All of these colors contain Red! How would that possibly work? With Red in every color, you could never expect to reproduce Yellow, Green, Cyan, or a wide range of other colors. Even if this pen contained as many as 6 colors (starting with Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow) such as the Hexachrome process, that is sometimes used in high end printing, the result might actually be a viable product, with a wide color gamut, assuming you could accurately mix the colors together in very fine increments, but the statement that it could produce “Every colour in the world” would still be a blatant lie. Also, you could never hope to match a particular color, without also compensating for the color of the paper you will be drawing on, and the light source in the space. Reflective color varies depending on the color of the ink, the color of the paper, the reflective properties of the paper and each of the inks used, and the type of light used to illuminate the subject matter. Without a light source, all reflective color appears to be black. Indoor lighting, vs. outdoor lighting (Sunlight for example) can greatly vary the appearance of color. The intensity of the light plays a big role as well.

More from Awesomer Media...

Martin Scorsese: God’s Eye View

Martin Scorsese: God’s Eye View

Resident Evil 7 (Gameplay)

Resident Evil 7 (Gameplay)

First Drive Review: 2017 Honda CR-V

First Drive Review: 2017 Honda CR-V

McLaren 570S Track Pack

McLaren 570S Track Pack

Joel Hodgson Reveals Lost Mystery Science Theater 3000 Episodes

Joel Hodgson Reveals Lost Mystery Science Theater 3000 Episodes

Limited Edition Rogue One 3D Glasses

Limited Edition Rogue One 3D Glasses

Advertisement