15 Complicated Life Lessons Bluey Taught the Adults in The Room

Ree Winter, an Australian journalist now based in New Orleans, combines her love for solo travel with a sharp eye for great flight and accommodation deals. She eagerly shares her travel insights with her audience, drawing from her rich experiences. Ree holds a Master's degree in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in Literature and History. Her fascination with history is evident in her stint as a tour guide at historic house museums, showcasing her knowledge of architectural history. Beyond journalism and history, Ree has a unique flair for coffee culture. As a barista, she's operated a coffee van at various events and markets, showcasing her skill in coffee preparation.

The Australian cartoon Bluey has managed to grab the hearts and minds of audiences everywhere. While you might typically put on a cartoon for the kids and then occupy yourself with other tasks, Bluey compels you to stay engaged and watch alongside them.

This cartoon entertains and provides life lessons without being condescending like other children’s TV, making it a rare find that children and adults can enjoy together.

Through its relatable characters and timeless themes, Bluey offers a refreshing and uplifting perspective on family dynamics, making it a beloved show that adults and children discuss. While many lessons can be taken from the show, some stand out more than others.

1. “The Show” — Dealing with Loss

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

There are several themes in this particular episode, such as “everyone makes mistakes” when Bingo thinks she’s ruined her mum’s day by dropping her well-meant breakfast in bed on the floor. The thing that got everyone talking about this episode, though, was the seemingly subtle reference to mom Chili having a miscarriage.

Creator Joe Blum confirmed this was the case in an interview. The result was that people in forums discussed how this episode helped them in similar situations.

2. “The Show Part Two” — Resilience

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

The other lesson in “The Show” concerns dealing with life’s little hiccups. When Bingo runs off, thinking she’s ruined her mom’s day, Chilli tells her that one way to deal with things like this is to have a checklist.

While Chilli is giving her child advice, it’s good advice for adults too. Sometimes, when things get overwhelming, we can cry, pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and keep going. “The show must go on,” Chilli says. Resilience is an important life skill, no matter what age you are.

3. “Daddy Putdown” — Communication is Best

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

In this episode, Chilli goes out for the evening. This is new for Bluey, and she misses her mum, so Dad Bandit works hard to entertain the kids.

Bandit realizes that the best way to deal with Bluey’s sadness is to talk about it rather than preoccupying her with games. Bluey can deal with her mum’s absence through discussion and better understanding.

4. “Grannies” — Stereotypes

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Bluey and Bingo are playing a game of “Grannies,” which involves dressing up and acting like elderly people, perpetuating false stereotypes about older people. During one scene, Bingo floss dances, resulting in them asking the question: “Do grannies floss?”

Instead of telling the kids “No,” Bandit defers to his elders and lets the kids’ Nanna tell them herself. This is a great lesson in never assuming something because of stereotypes and that the best person to ask is the person in question.

5. “Magic Xylophone” — Patience

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

The girls are having fun “freezing” each other and their Dad with a “magic xylophone.” Bluey and Bingo argue over who gets a turn, and it’s up to Dad to help out.

The episode teaches adults the value of patience and cooperation in working through conflicts with their children. It emphasizes the importance of taking turns and finding common ground in relationships.

6. “Wagon Ride” — Communicating with Kids

Image Credit: Ludo Studio..

In this episode, Bandit takes the kids to the playground in a wagon. He stops to talk to a friend. In frustration, Bluey interrupts him because she wants to get to the park. Instead of getting cross with her or punishing her, Bandit comes up with a solution that works for both.

He tells Bluey that if she needs to talk to him while he’s speaking with a grown-up, she can come and put her hand on his arm, and he will put his hand on hers to show that he understands. This method has received a lot of praise from the neurodivergent community.

7. “The Baby Race” — First Time Mom

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Chilli tells Bluey about the first time she walked. Like most first-time moms, Chilli felt unsure she was doing things correctly because other babies in her mother’s group reached their milestones first. She experienced feelings of inadequacy until a friend, Ella, came to talk to her.

Ella is a mom of nine. She says that being a first-time mom was hard. “You’re doing great,” she tells Chili, giving her a hug. Sometimes, we really need to hear words of encouragement from our friends.

8. “Sheepdog” — Mom Needs a Break

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

This show teaches us that we’re all human and we’re doing the best we can. After caring for Bluey and Bingo all day, Chilli asks Bandit to give her 20 minutes of alone time. This is a great lesson in how to be a supportive partner.

Bandit works hard to entertain the kids so they don’t bother their mom while she’s resting, but Bluey is confused and thinks she’s done something to upset her. “It can be hard work looking after kids. Sometimes Mums just need 20 minutes,” Chilli tells Bluey.

9. “The Decider” — Separation

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

“The Decider” is about a football game. Everyone is going for the same team except Chucky’s mom. Chucky can’t decide which team they want to be on. They watch some of the game with Dad and some with Mom. In the end, Chucky decides to go for Dad’s team. We can see that the mom is disappointed, but she tells Chucky it’s okay and their decision.

While this is a football game, it can teach adults a lot about dealing with separation and divorce. It’s healthy for the children to make decisions about who they want to spend time with emotional maturity.

10. “Grandad” — Getting Old

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Chilli and the kids visit Grandad, who’s supposed to rest since he just had heartworms. This is obviously meant to be the equivalent of a heart attack in the blue heeler world. Grandad is busy working and runs off with Bluey and Bingo when they leave the car.

Grandad tries to keep up, but he’s getting tired and rests. Adults can find accepting aging difficult. We don’t want to get old, but sometimes it’s important to listen to our bodies and rest.

11. “The Pool” — Boring Stuff is Important

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

The family has a chance to use a friend’s pool. Chilli reminds Bandit to check he has all that they need, but he just grabs a few fun things. On the car ride, Bluey says Mom can be too fussy. “Mum always makes us do so many boring things,” she says.

Once at the pool, Bandit realizes he forgot many important things, like sunscreen and hats. This means that the family doesn’t have the best time. This teaches us that the boring stuff is important. Taking the extra time to plan ahead can make a big difference.

12. “Takeaway” — Learning to Live in the Moment

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Getting some take-out food proves to be a huge challenge. While waiting, the kids get bored and start playing around, like most kids do. Bandit is getting frustrated, but then he reads a fortune cookie that says, “Flowers may bloom again, but a person never has a chance to be young again.”

Instead of getting mad at the girls, Bandit encourages play, taking meaning from the fortune cookie. This is an important lesson for adults that they can have fun, too, because one day, they may no longer have the opportunity.

13. “Duck Cake” — Be Kind to Others

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Bluey learns that kindness can be its own reward. She sees Dad upset when his attempt to make a duck cake for Bingo’s birthday isn’t going well. Without being asked, she cleans the mess he made on the floor and realizes that Dad’s gratefulness makes her happy.

The duck cake doesn’t look very pretty, but when he presents it to Bingo, she proclaims that she loves it, and Bandit is thrilled. As adults, we can sometimes strive too hard for perfection when taking the time to make an effort can be more important to others.

14. “Camping” — Letting Go

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

People come and go in our lives all the time. In this episode, Bluey makes a new friend while camping and is very upset when it’s time for him to leave. Mom consoles her, saying, “Sometimes special people come into our lives, stay for a bit, and then they have to go.”

Chilli tells Bluey it’s sad, but when they were here, it was happy; therefore, the time with her friend was worth it. People have trouble letting go of the past and learning that sometimes people move on in one way or another, but we would rather have had them in our lives than not.

15. “Queens” — Lead by Example

Image Credit: Ludo Studio.

Watching any episode of Bluey gives viewers a wealth of parenting tips. In “Queens,” Chilli demonstrates the importance of hard work, and Bluey follows her example.

Leading by example is one of the most important things to learn — even for adults, especially those in leadership roles. Think of all the times you’ve had a bad boss or manager who expects a lot from you but makes no effort. The best boss leads by example and helps you to respect them in the process.

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Ree Winter, an Australian journalist now based in New Orleans, combines her love for solo travel with a sharp eye for great flight and accommodation deals. She eagerly shares her travel insights with her audience, drawing from her rich experiences. Ree holds a Master's degree in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in Literature and History. Her fascination with history is evident in her stint as a tour guide at historic house museums, showcasing her knowledge of architectural history. Beyond journalism and history, Ree has a unique flair for coffee culture. As a barista, she's operated a coffee van at various events and markets, showcasing her skill in coffee preparation.