Pegasus Flying Car Drives Like A Car, Flies Like A Helicopter

With over 17 years of writing experience, Jonathan has had a passion for all things tech-related, ever since watching Inspector Gadget as a child. He's disassembled countless appliances and managed to put a few back together, and one still works. When not writing, he can often be found playing video games or accidentally hurting himself in the garage.

In development since 2009, the Pegasus E flying car can drive at highway speeds up to 75MPH (electronically limited) and fly like a helicopter at speeds up to 100MPH. The best of both worlds! If only it could dive like a submarine it would be a real trifecta. Did James Bond ever have one of those?

The carbon fiber Pegasus weighs 585 lbs and can carry a single passenger up to 222 lbs. It can reach altitudes up to 5,900 feet and has a roughly 3-hour, 261-mile range with its 16 gallon fuel tank. It reminds me of a vehicle I’d expect to see in a new Mario Kart game, probably with Waluigi grinning behind the wheel.

Being able to sell the vehicle as a street-legal car may prove troublesome, and the company is considering creating a 3-wheeled version (seen above) so that it qualifies as a motorcycle and can bypass the strict safety requirements of cars. This version would ditch the tail rotor and feature a stacked coaxial top rotor system instead. Hey, whatever keeps the highway patrol off my back.

In Australia where the Pegasus was developed, it requires a recreational helicopter pilot’s license to operate. The company is now moving its operations to Las Vegas, Nevada, though, and US operators may only need to have “completed the FAA Private Pilot written examination and…the company-mandated vehicle familiarization and operator training programs,” to fly. Of course, having a brave heart and devil-may-care attitude certainly won’t hurt, either.

[via NewAtlas]

Journalist at Technabob | Website | + posts

With over 17 years of writing experience, Jonathan has had a passion for all things tech-related, ever since watching Inspector Gadget as a child. He's disassembled countless appliances and managed to put a few back together, and one still works. When not writing, he can often be found playing video games or accidentally hurting himself in the garage.